Tag Archives: Architect

How Can We “Grow” Architecture Part I

GROW

Can we grow architecture?

This is a powerful term and can be implemented into all forms of design, however today we focus this word around architecture and how it can be implemented.

Reduce – Reuse – Recycle – Grow

As designers it is important, especially in this decade, to pay attention to creating structures that include eco-friendly, sustainable methods, while still mastering the incredible aesthetics. In this article, we look at ways of improving living at a better cost while focusing on sustainability — reuse.

Discover some creative, interesting natural building materials that can be used to create the perfect eco home:

HEMPCRETE

Have you ever heard of HempCrete? This material is much like concrete, only it is made from the inner fibers of a hemp plant. Hemp is a fast-growing and replaceable plant that, mixed with lime and water, can be used to create thermal and biocompatible walling. This results in a strong lightweight material which is fireproof, waterproof, and well-insulated.

Take a look at the use of HempCrete in Cape Town

MYCELIUM

100% natural, Mycelium is a building material of the future. It incorporates the root structure of fungi and mushrooms. This is then used to grow around other natural materials such as straw in form or cut up corn stalks and hemp, and then when dried over a couple of days, it results in the creation of strong, durable, lightweight bricks.

CARDBOARD

Cardboard, incredibly popular in the design world, grants designers no limit. As with everything, it has its pros and cons, but could it be utilized to construct a building? The answer is yes.

The sky is the limit

Cardboard can be protected from weather conditions effectively with the use of breathable, waterproof film. Finished with wooden cladding boards, it can be ultimately weatherproof. It is a great way for an architect with the aim to construct according to sustainability, cost, and approaching urban areas.

Cardboard extends itself even more in a creative way of fulfilling many design elements by its use for interiors, objects such as architectural models, tents, even fashion – the sky is the limit.

Ever popular party in Portugal, Boom Festival had outstanding eco-friendly approaches throughout the event. From well-designed luxury cardboard tents (known as the cardboard village) to compost toilets and use of solar energy to power the event. Below is a link to the Cardboard Village and view more of their approaches here: Boom Festival Environmental Approaches

Cardboard Village - Boom Festival 2018
Cardboard Village – Boom Festival 2018

Another great example of cardboard housing is the “Wikkelhouse” in Amsterdam by Fiction Factory. There are many ways in which sustainable design can be implemented, don’t be afraid to “go green.”

It’s the future.

Design for Change

Architectural Design, amongst all other types, has the ability to be “life-changing” and better yet, able to change the world. Many designers often focus on aesthetic features and generating some form of income.

Design falls into two categories: aesthetic design and problem-solving design, although problem-solving design can still be aesthetically pleasing. 

AESTHETIC DESIGN

This refers to how we think and feel about a product or design. The first impression plays a big role here when something is nice to look at therefore aesthetically pleasing. A common example of aesthetic design is certain high heels and their visually appealing style, opposing to the endless pain women go through wearing them. As someone once said, “beauty is pain!” 

Below are the three categories of aesthetics:

VISUAL AESTHETICS

This is visually appealing design consisting of elements such as colour, pattern, shape, balance and texture. Humans are very visual therefore designers often aim to create things that are beautiful and nice to look at.  

MATERIAL AESTHETICS

These are the materials used in the design with elements such as texture, weight, comfort and shape. This refers to the sleek design of the new watch you just bought or your new jacket that you shouldn’t have bought, but couldn’t resist. 

SOUND AESTHETICS

This refers to the sounds of the design. For example comparing two different speakers. Another example is the start of the engine of a car. You will hear the difference of sound. 

PROBLEM-SOLVING DESIGN

In order to solve problems with any form of design, you need to have a strong understanding of whats happening around you. Following social media, the news and conducting research can help gain some insight. Some of the main topics to target with design (for change) are:

HOMELESS

In the past, designers have creatively approached homelessness with design strategies to supply shelter and housing. How can you as a designer approach this? 

NATURAL DISASTERS   

Think of ways to act after a disaster. For example, there was an earthquake resistant school designed in Thailand. Prevent fires by designing communities surrounded by fire breaks. 

ENVIRONMENT

How can we conserve the planet with design? Think green design, recycling, sustainability. Solar powered designs have become a very effective approach. 

CRIME

Crime is a global issue. Architectural design can be utilized to create safer environments. Cities can be designed in ways that are better for surveillance. 

Think bigger remember that your idea could change someone else’s life. Collaborate with other designers and address social/environmental issues. Create projects. Design for change.

Welcome to the life of an Architect Pt 1

THE PEOPLE

The most important factor is the people that will be using the space that is designed. Each structure has a different purpose. Did you know that Will Wright, the creator of The Sims, originally made the game as an architectural simulator with living people to see how they would adjust to the buildings created? Following this, Maxis and EA Games discovered the idea and it took off.

COFFEE

Treasure it! Long nights and hard work. Every architect enjoys a good cup of coffee. It’s definitely perfect for every scenario such as long nights, meetings or site missions with clients!

PATIENCE

When working on a project it’s important to focus on the present rather than the future outcome, therefore the process will be more productive. Don’t expect things too early.

RULES

Push the boundaries and be spontaneous. We all learn with basic rules such as projects and exams but in the outside world, it’s important to negotiate and explore.

STYLE

When it comes to a personal style, stay open-minded. Remember that clients may request something different and you have to adapt. Notice the word adapt. Your style will always be in your work one way or another.

ENVIRONMENT

We are at a time where sustainable design can always be implemented in some way. Here are a few quick tips:

  • Recycled Materials
  • Eco-Friendly Lighting
  • Use of local materials/sources
  • On-site waste management
  • Building placement
  • Designing buildings with natural light and air-flow

 

Wildetecture blog by Tarryn Hardwicke

What it really means to be an ARCHITECT

A R C H I T E C T

Ambitious

Reliable

Compassionate

Hardworking

Innovative

Talented

Experimental

Clever

Technical

Architects are dreamers. They have wild imaginations and unique minds. What makes a successful architect is one that has drive, passion and isn’t afraid to be different.  It takes a certain type of person to pursue this occupation and heres why:

Ambitious people are the ones that have a better chance of succeeding. Having drive and determination fuels your path to success. To be reliable shows that you respect your clients. Having compassion when conversing with clients is vital as you are turning their dream into a reality. An architect works hard to achieve their goals. Architects are innovative and come up with fresh and new ideas while exerting creativity and uniqueness. An architect has exceptional talent and grows more each and every day. To be experimental is to attempt the unknown and learn from mistakes. Architects are clever and extremely technical.

One needs to have optimism, realism or even better – both. Believe in your ability, attempt the unknown, while being prepared for anything. Turning wild ideas into reality while effectively conquering functionality at the same time is talent. When it comes to design, its either in your blood or it’s not, everybody was born with their purpose. One needs to be flexible and have the ability to juggle multiple projects at a time.

Most importantly, LOVE what you do.

Written by Tarryn Hardwicke